You are here

Is the Machine Hive Mind Safe?

In the preface to Saint Joan, his play about Joan of Arc, the teenager whose visions of saints and archangels stirred soldiers into battle early in the 15th century, George Bernard Shaw makes a surprisingly compelling argument that following Joan of Arc’s mystical visions was at least as rational as following a modern-day general into today’s battlefield full of highly technological and incomprehensible weapons of war. His argument is that the warrior of the 20th century was driven as much by faith as the warrior of the 15th century: In the Middle Ages people believed that the earth was flat, for which they had at least the evidence of their senses: We believe it to be round, not because as many as one percent of us could give the physical reasons for so quaint a belief, but because modern science has convinced us that nothing that is obvious is true, and that everything that is magical, improbable, extraordinary, gigantic, microscopic, heartless, or outrageous is scientific. Hyperbole, for sure, but it is remarkable how much we depend on what we’re told to get by in the modern world. So little of what happens to us is understood through direct sensory experience. From the alarm that wakes us up, to the toilet that we wander to, to the smartphone that we turn on (before or after our visit to the bathroom), to the coffee machine that welcomes us into the kitchen, to the tap that we use to fill the coffee machine, nothing is completely within our conceptual grasp. But we use these tools; we even rely on them, because they work (except when they don’t and our life goes a little out of balance). We can thank the experts who created them, for we are dependent on their know-how. We have faith in the masters of modern technology after years of successfully using their devices. But when those devices fail, when the cable service goes out or the drain emits brown sludge, we’re rudely reminded of just how little we know about the conveniences of modern life.A “knowledge illusion” occurs because we live in a community of knowledge and we fail to distinguish the knowledge that is in our heads from the knowledge outside of it. We think the knowledge we have about how things work sits inside our skulls when in fact we’re drawing a lot of it from the environment and from other people. This is as much a feature of cognition as it is a bug. The world and our community house most of our knowledge base. A lot of human understanding consists simply of awareness that the knowledge is out there. Sophisticated understanding usually consists of knowing where to find it. Only the truly erudite actually have the knowledge available in their own memories. The knowledge illusion is the flip side of what economists call the curse of knowledge. When we know about something, we find it hard to imagine that someone else doesn’t know it. If…

Read More
News Movies 

‘Something Beautiful Happened’ Is the Unbelievable Journey of a Woman Searching for the Family Her Grandmother Helped in WWII

“Extra” Senior Producer Yvette Manessis Corporon grew up listening to her Greek grandmother’s stories about the Jewish family she hid, and ultimately helped save from the Nazis during WWII. Yvette’s tireless search for the descendants of that family sparked an unbelievable journey that led to a joyful reunion, followed by devastating loss. Yvette eloquently writes about both in her new book, “Something Beautiful Happened,” a powerful testament to what is possible when courage and love overcome fear and hate. The story will soon be told in a feature-length documentary film. You can order Yvette’s book “Something Beautiful Happened,” today! Source link

Read More

The Lost Art of Emailing: How Emailing Can Make Us More Productive and Efficient Again

Are you one of those people who see email as an annoyance and not a productivity tool? Do you see email as a barrier to getting things done? Then you are certainly not alone. Millions of people have grown to hate email because it piles up in a never-ending stream of messages, beeps and alerts. I see so many people with the alert bubble on their email app showing four figures. These people have simply given up on email and only respond to the emails they receive from their boss or most important customers. Instead they are turning to other communication tools such as Slack and Twist and quickly finding that rather than solving their problems, these apps just exasperates the Why People Stop Using Emails? The problem for most people is they have not learned how to manage their email, or if they do know how to manage their email, they do not practice those management methods on a daily basis. And like anything else, if you are not managing it, it soon descends into an unmanageable mess. Yet, email should never be seen in this way. Email is simply the best communications technology created in the last forty years or so. It allows us to communicate effortlessly with people on the other side of the world, it is real time and has allowed us the opportunity to be able to work from anywhere at any time. Email is quite possibly the best productivity tool there is. How To Use Emails To Become More Productive Again? So, in the spirit of bringing email back into your life as a fundamental productivity tool you love using, here are five tips to get email working for you. 1. Treat Your Inbox As a Collection Point Your inbox is not a storage box. Your inbox is a place where new email is collected and then processed. In the days before email, when we received mail, we did not just look at the envelope, decide it was not important and stuff in back in the mailbox. We moved it somewhere. Our desk, the trash can or on the mantlepiece to be dealt with later. If you had stuffed the mail back into your mailbox, the mailman would have thought you rather weird. So don’t do that with email. When an email comes in, decide what needs to be done with it and move it to its appropriate place. Over time, you will get better at making these decisions and will soon find dealing with email is a breeze. 2. Set up a few basic folders The emails we receive every day fall into a few very clear categories. There are emails that require you to do something, emails containing information, which requires no action from yourself except just read them sometime, and update emails that contain information you need to know about but need no action from yourself. So, the only folders you need are: “Action Today”, “Reference” and “Archive”. That’s it. Just…

Read More

Small-Town US Troops Die in Higher Numbers Than Big City Counterparts

Soldiers from small towns with economic and social ills have reportedly born the greatest burden for America’s defense since 2001, fighting and dying in greater proportions than those from more prosperous urban areas. According to The Wall Street Journal, an analysis of Pentagon data on the hometowns of 6,800 military casualties from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan through 2016 show that 23 percent came from small towns and rural areas — even though those places make up only 17 percent of the U.S. population. That compares with 23 percent of those killed who came from metropolitan areas of more than 1 million people, where 29 percent of Americans live. To highlight the difficulties soldiers from those rural areas face, the Journal recounted the stories of twin brothers Chris and Mike Goski of Red Oak, Texas — Chris a Marine and Mike an Army Special Forces vet — who enlisted shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Both suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, and committed suicide after their service — Chris in 2012, and twin Mike in 2016 — despite the offer of help from Gen. Raymond Thomas, who has made suicide prevention a priority in his role as commander of the U.S. Special Operations Command. © 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved. Source link

Read More
News 

Giant DIY bagel bite puts all the small ones to shame

One regular Bagel Bite isn’t enough, not even five are. But a giant one can reduce the cravings. HellthyJunkFood, known for recreating popular fast food recipes, decided to make their own Bagel Bites including a huge one you might need two hands (or four) to hold. The fun size bites looked right out of the store-bought box, but the jumbo size bagel bite might just need a new name—and a bigger microwave.  Source link

Read More
News Music 

Fergie Save It Till Morning Music Video

Shortly after announcing her split from Josh Duhamel, Fergie released an impassioned music video that seemingly addresses the unexpected breakup. Off the singer’s brand new album, Double Dutchess, “Save It Till Morning” depicts the unraveling of a high-profile couple with Jay Hernandez playing the role of her partner. In one particularly heated moment, Fergie sings, “I won’t be your punching bag. Why did I put up with that? We gotta figure it out. You don’t want me to figure that out.” The video ends with her leaving the dysfunctional relationship and riding off into the sunset in her own damn limousine. In addition to the “Save It Till Morning” video (which totally reminds us of “Big Girls Don’t Cry”!), Fergie also released four other videos for songs off her new album. The video for “Enchanté (Carine)” stars Kendall Jenner and features adorable vocals from her 4-year-old son, Axl Jack, and clearly heralds a new direction for the pop star. Source link

Read More
News 

Sleep pods are becoming increasingly common at airports

IN THEORY, overnight air travel should be wonderfully convenient. Instead of booking a hotel for the night and losing a day, travellers simply sleep while they fly. In reality, sleeping on a plane is hard, and at an airport tougher still. The chairs in terminals, nobody’s idea of comfort to begin with, tend to have armrests that make splaying out unfeasible. Even in business-class lounges, travellers contort themselves into impossible shapes to pretend that workspace desks are actually beds.But soon there may be less need for such acrobatics. Sleep pods are coming to more and more airports. Last month, Washington Dulles International put out a call for proposals for a company to provide “a quiet and comfortable place within the airport to sleep, relax, or work while waiting to board a flight”. Mexico City’s airport has just added sleep pods with a space-age design for $30 a night. YotelAir, which offers pods in…Continue reading Source link

Read More
News 

Uber Loses Its License to Operate in London

Uber had hoped that new leadership would help it turn the corner on a turbulent period.The decision by Transport for London, which is responsible for the city’s subways and buses, as well as regulating its taxicabs, illustrates the gravity and severity of the issues confronting Uber. And a ban on operating in one of its largest markets — a global city where it has 40,000 drivers and 3.5 million customers use its app at least once every three months — would hit the company’s bottom line.Transport for London said it had concluded that Uber was “not fit and proper to hold a private hire operator license.”Among the issues it raised: how Uber deals with serious criminal offenses; how it conducts background checks on drivers; and its explanation for its use of a software program called Greyball that “could be used to block regulatory bodies from gaining full access to the app.”Tom Elvidge, Uber’s general manager in London, said that the agency and London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, had “caved in to a small number of people who want to restrict consumer choice.”Uber conducted background checks using the same methods as those used for black-cab drivers, he said.“Our pioneering technology has gone further to enhance safety with every trip tracked and recorded by GPS,” he said, adding that the company had “a dedicated team who work closely with the Metropolitan Police.”He added that Greyball “has never been used or considered in the U.K.” for the purposes cited by Transport for London. Continue reading the main story Uber is used in more than 600 cities around the world, and in more than 40 cities and towns in Britain. According to the company, by 2015 it had driven Londoners almost 100 million miles, and taken them on 20 million trips.“This ban would show the world that, far from being open, London is closed to innovative companies who bring choice to consumers,” Mr. Elvidge said. John Colley, a professor at Warwick Business School, said the decision was the latest sign of an erosion in Uber’s corporate image.“There is a very long list of businesses who have suffered for failing to uphold the level of values necessary,” he said. “Until Uber gets this message, then it will suffer lost trade as a result of its deteriorating reputation.”Uber arrived in London in 2012, just ahead of the Summer Olympics, initially with a luxury service, adding UberX, which competes more directly with London’s storied black taxis, a year later.Its debut here created a clash almost immediately with those black cabs, which trace their roots to 1634. To earn their licenses, black-cab drivers must memorize some 25,000 streets and 100,000 landmarks across the capital for an exam known as The Knowledge, considered among the world’s toughest.Black-cab drivers complain that Uber drivers are under-regulated and that they don’t have to satisfy the same exacting standards. Moreover, Uber fares are about 30 percent lower than those of black cabs, whose drivers fear that Uber will put them out of business.The conflict…

Read More
News 

The Evolution of the Mobile Phone Perfectly Illustrated in One Image

Since Motorola’s senior engineer Martin Cooper made the first ever mobile phone call to a rival telecommunications company to let them know he was calling from a mobile back in 1973, mobile phones have come a long way. Motorola’s first ever mobile phone, the Dynatac 8000X which was released in 1983, weighed an impressive 1.75lb’s and stood at 13-inches tall, a far cry from the compact handheld smartphones that we’re used to today.It was Motorola that paved the way for nearly a decade until 1992 when Nokia showed up with the 1011. Mobile phones began to get smaller as manufactures were able to shrink the technology needed to make a functioning mobile until we were left with the likes of the Nokia 3310, a phone famed for it’s amazing battery and incredible durability compared to what’s on offer at the moment.During the mid-2000’s however something strange began to happen. Some two decades later mobile phones began to get bigger, partly due to bigger screens as consumers demanded more from their phones. Making calls and sending messages was no longer enough. Games, music, photos and video were now a must. Whilst manufacturers delivered what people wanted the first ‘smartphones’ were hit and miss – slow hardware and buggy apps made for some terrible user experiences. Then along came the iPhone in 2007.Although it wasn’t without its flaws the iPhone presented everything that was currently available on the market but in a far more polished, well presented package and people bought into it. This set the standard for other manufacturers who were quick to follow the iPhone’s distinct design, leading us to where we are today. Giant glossy screens with phone capable of doing just about everything a computer can.To demonstrated the evolution of smartphones in the real world Reddit user zHighlander uploaded this image. As you can see, it’s incredibly similar to the illustrated timeline above.via UltraLinx Source link

Read More
News 

4 injured as plane crash-lands in Istanbul airport – media (VIDEO) — RT News

Published time: 21 Sep, 2017 21:15 A private plane caught fire when it made an emergency landing at Istanbul’s Ataturk International Airport Thursday. Four people were injured. Three crew members, two pilots and a flight attendant, and one passenger were injured Dogan news agency reports.The Cyprus-bound private jet crashed soon after taking off, Milliyet reports. All air traffic to and from Ataturk was halted but has since been resumed, AP reports.Airlive reports the plane tried to return to the airport when a failure alarm was triggered. The tire exploded during the landing.Firefighters were waiting on the runway once the pilots raised the alarm. They fought to extinguish the fire, which has since been brought under control.  Flight Radar reports the aircraft was a Cessna 650 Citation 7, with the registration TC-KON. The plane was operated by Koçoğlu Aviation belonging to EuroAir, Dogan reports.At this stage it isn’t clear what caused the plane’s alarm to be triggered. Source link

Read More