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Uma Thurman responds to Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal

Uma Thurman attends “The Parisian Woman” Press Meet & Greet at The New 42nd Street Studios on Oct. 18, 2017 in New York City.Image: Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images By Shannon Connellan2017-11-24 00:02:07 UTC “You don’t deserve a bullet.” Actor Uma Thurman, star of Harvey Weinstein-produced films like Kill Bill, has delivered a characteristically dynamite message to the producer this Thanksgiving. It’s the first time Thurman has expanded on her early November statement on Weinstein, who is facing sexual assault and harassment accusations from over 100 women. Posting on Instagram with a Thanksgiving message, Thurman took the opportunity to administer a swipe at Weinstein, paired with a screenshot of her Kill Bill character, The Bride. Thurman doesn’t disclose her specific experience with sexual harassment, but uses the hashtag #MeToo. “Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! (Except you Harvey, and all your wicked conspirators — I’m glad it’s going slowly — you don’t deserve a bullet),” she wrote. H A P P Y T H A N K S G I V I N G I am grateful today, to be alive, for all those I love, and for all those who have the courage to stand up for others. I said I was angry recently, and I have a few reasons, #metoo, in case you couldn’t tell by the look on my face. I feel it’s important to take your time, be fair, be exact, so… Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! (Except you Harvey, and all your wicked conspirators – I’m glad it’s going slowly – you don’t deserve a bullet) -stay tuned Uma Thurman A post shared by Uma Thurman (@ithurman) on Nov 23, 2017 at 12:58pm PST Wow. Thurman first responded to the Weinstein scandal on Nov. 4, on the red carpet at her new play The Parisian Woman. Pressed for comment, Thurman appeared guarded, but undeniably angry. “I’ve learned that when I have spoken in anger, I usually regret the way that I have expressed myself. So I’ve been waiting to feel less angry,” she said. Though Thurman has yet to comment further about the accusations against Weinstein, a 1989 interview in Rolling Stone did the rounds recently, featuring her thoughts on the treatment of women in Hollywood 30 years ago. Has much changed? Source link

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F.C.C. Plan to Roll Back Net Neutrality Worries Small Businesses

The regulations, established by the F.C.C. in 2015, have heavyweights on both sides of the debate. Internet giants like Google and Amazon say that net neutrality preserves free speech; telecom titans like AT&T and Verizon warn that the existing rules put a chokehold on free-market commerce. In a blog post on Tuesday, Comcast’s chief executive, David N. Watson, wrote that his company “does not and will not block, throttle, or discriminate against lawful content.” Internet service providers say that the proposal would lead to a better variety of services for online customers and more innovation in the industry. For small businesses, a rollback could fundamentally change how, and whether, they do business. Many started online or turned to e-commerce to expand their thin margins. “Things are already difficult enough as it is for a small businesses,” Mr. Callicott said. “You’re busy enough just keeping your company running, trying to grow and succeed or just stay alive, that you don’t have the resources or the time to contemplate how to prepare for something like this.” In the United States, 99.7 percent of all businesses have fewer than 500 employees, according to government statistics. Of those, nearly 80 percent, or more than 23 million enterprises, are one-person operations. More than a quarter of small firms said they planned to expand their e-commerce platforms in 2017, according to the National Small Business Association. Photo David Callicott runs a small company, GoodLight Natural Candles, in San Francisco. “For such an analog product, we’re heavily reliant on the digital world and the internet for our day-to-day operations,” he said. “The internet, the speed of it, our entire business revolves around that.” Credit Peter Prato for The New York Times In August, the American Sustainable Business Council and other small business groups published an open letter to the F.C.C. on behalf of more than 500 small businesses in the country. Weakening or undoing net neutrality protections would be “disastrous” for American businesses, according to the letter. Continue reading the main story “The open internet has made it possible for us to rely on a free market where each of us has the chance to bring our best business ideas to the world without interference or seeking permission from any gatekeeper first,” the groups wrote. Many entrepreneurs worried that, without net neutrality provisions, internet providers would wield their increased power to control how businesses reach consumers. Online consumers are a demanding crowd. Research from a Google subsidiary suggested that visitors who have to wait more than 3 seconds for a mobile site to load will abandon their search 53 percent of the time. Critics of the F.C.C. proposal say internet service providers could manipulate traffic speeds to establish a “fast lane” of sorts or cap or block access to certain sites, charging fees to lift the restrictions. Small enterprises would struggle to pay, leaving them at a commercial disadvantage, they said. Independent contractors like Clayton Cowles, who works in upstate New York, could also be vulnerable. Mr….

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Obscure Scenario Card Games : card party game

The ‘OR?!’ Card Party Game Forces Players to Make a Tough Choice The ‘OR?!’ card party game has been created to offer players a distinctly ridiculous choice to make when it’s their turn. Coming with 350 individual playing cards, the ‘OR?!’ card game offers players with nine different ways to play that are all focused on them making choices regarding their fate. Board games and card games have risen in popularity amongst consumer demographics like Millennials who are looking for an offline way to enjoy time with friends. This is seeing new creations like the ‘OR?!’ card party game coming about to offer players a pastime that is intended to start conversations and incite laughter. The game can last anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes and is suitable for three or more players. Source link

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Multi-Sensory Cocktail Tastings : cocktail tasting

The Berkeley’s ‘Out of the Blue’ Features Scent, Sound and Visuals ‘Out of the Blue’ is a new and immersive cocktail tasting experience from London hotel The Berkeley that promises to engage one’s sense of taste, sight, hearing and smell. The all-new experience was developed with The Blue Bar at the Knightsbridge hotel in partnership with Bacardi Brown-Forman Brands and takes inspiration from The Blue Bar’s ‘True Colours’ menu. To enhance the experience of consuming cocktails made with Bombay Sapphire gin, Grey Goose vodka, Bacardí Ocho rum and Aberfeldy single malt scotch, guests are invited to take a multi-sensory journey by enjoying 360-degree visuals from a film. Layered on top of this, Out of the Blue also integrates sounds and molecular scents to deepen the flavor experience. Out of the Blue is said to create “a coherent flavour experience, tantalising the taste buds through a journey where light acidity and sweetness is balanced by potency and depth.” Source link

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A Breathtaking Illustration Of How Congress Got So Partisan

The data viz designer Mike Cisneros has mapped out the political positions of every member of Congress ever, starting with the first Congress in 1789 up until the 115th Congress that’s currently filling the news cycle with so much anguish. The central visualization is a giant scatterplot, where positions are mapped based on how conservative or liberal each Congress member is economically and socially. The data, analyzed by UCLA’s Department of Political Science and Social Science Computing, measures every historical Congress member’s political beliefs based on their voting record, with the two central factors being economic forces and social issues. The average for today’s Congress is more economically conservative and–surprisingly–slightly socially liberal. [Image: Mike Cisneros] Fascinatingly, below the galaxy-like map, Cisneros also visualizes the formation of our modern-day political sphere over the past 228 years. Initially, Congress is fragmented in a group of morphing political parties–Federalists, Whigs, Democrats, Republicans, Democrat-Republicans, Andrew Jackson’s party, the anti-Andrew Jackson party. “By the 25th Congress, in 1837, U.S. politics have settled into a primarily two-party system of Whigs and Democrats,” Cisneros tells Co.Design in an email. “This is where an ideological gulf between the two main parties begins to become evident.” [Image: Mike Cisneros] As the decades progress, the divide between the two parties gets deeper and deeper, angling more conservative overall in some years and more liberal in others. In the 1920s, parties are mostly divided by how they approach economic issues, while both Republicans and Democrats run the gamut on social and race-related issues. [Image: Mike Cisneros] A striking shift occurs beginning in the Bush era, and it’s magnified during the Obama years. The clusters of red and blue dots, while once much more distributed in stretched-out, mirrored cloud shapes, begin to separate further and coalesce into compact groups that look more like tightly packed balls. The viz points to how the parties have become more entrenched in their belief systems, with the breath of the spectrum along which Congress members’ positions lie decreasing over time on both sides of the aisle. It’s “almost like a cell dividing into two,” Cisneros writes. “Is it any wonder that there is a historically small amount of bipartisan governance?” Source link

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The case for reforming airport-slot allocation

GULLIVER is back from the 141st Slot Conference in Madrid, a meeting of airlines and airport co-ordinators run by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), an airline lobby group. In this week’s issue, he opened the lid on how landing and take-off slots are allocated at congested airports around the world: Instead of letting airports decide who would use their runways and when, the system was designed to have schedules hammered out by committees of airlines. In the 1960s, as growing traffic started to fill up some airports, the committees became a way of parcelling out the most prized slots. Since the 1970s, allocation has been steered in most countries by IATA’s “Worldwide Slot Guidelines”. These state that an airline can keep a given slot from the previous season as long as it used the slot 80% of the time. Any slots freed up under this “use it or lose it” rule are allocated to other applicants. Some places, including the European Union, insist that new entrants must receive half of these. Upgrade your inbox Receive our Daily Dispatch and Editors’ Picks newsletters. The problem, as Gulliver goes on to explain, is that incumbent airlines—particularly those legacy carriers that originally got their slots for free—are hogging them in order to try and shut out new entrants. Over 190 congested airports—103 of them in Europe—follow rules that IATA describes as “fair, neutral and transparent” Hogwash. To comply with the “use it or lose it” rule, many airlines resort to artifice—flying smaller planes than necessary in order to spread capacity across their slots, for example, and even running empty “ghost” flights to ensure that the runways are busy at the appointed time. So instead of slots being recycled from established carriers to new ones, they are clung to. One analysis showed that only 0.4% of London Heathrow’s total slots and 0.7% of Paris Charles de Gaulle’s were allocated to new entrants during the period under study. Around the world regulators want to change this system in order to boost competition and help consumers get cheaper fares and better services. Aviation watchdogs in America and China, for instance, have suggested that they should run the allocation of slots by an impartial auction. Others have suggested congestion pricing as an alternative. These ideas have faced much criticism by airlines. Many complain that they, “who know all about the industry”, should allocate slots instead of “know-nothing economists” working for the regulators. Yet a quick glance at the “Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith, the father of economics, suggests why competition watchdogs are so unhappy with the current set-up: People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices. It is impossible indeed to prevent such meetings, by any law which either could be executed, or would be consistent with liberty or justice. But though the law cannot hinder people of the same trade from sometimes assembling…

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